Discussion Forum

Hopefully everything will work smoothly for you – however, if there is something wrong, please take a moment to email us (forum@badminton-coach.co.uk) so that we can put it right !

 Please do not SPAM this forum – anyone found posting non-badminton related messages or ADVERTISING without permission will be removed without notice and may be banned from using the forum in the future.

Membership of this Badminton Discussion Forum is FREE

To join, just click the Register button just BELOW on the right.  Please note however that any strange email addresses (lots of random letters etc) with an obscure user name will be deleted.

Join My Email Community

Get My Badminton Help, Advice, Hints & Tips

Direct To Your Email Inbox

Join My Email Community

Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
When to move
September 6, 2014
5:04 pm
Avatar
Dobbie98
Member
Members

VIP Coaching Program Members
Forum Posts: 165
Member Since:
December 4, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hello forum, I’m trying to improve my footwork, especially being flat footed & sometimes got caught back on my heels, especially when I’m expecting a smash & they either play a fast clear or a drop shot. I find I’m having to consciously tell my self to be ready. So when is the best time to move / react to the oppositions shot. Do you split step just before opponent hits the shuttle? Do you wait to see the direction of the shuttle?
Your thoughts will be gratefully received.

September 7, 2014
3:35 am
Avatar
AlexLaw
Canada
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 45
Member Since:
November 3, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

1. When you’re playing a game and you’re not over 40, ALWAYS be ready when you are playing badminton. This doesn’t only include receive smash-it could be service returns, moving to front when the opponent has hit to your partner’s back court. If you get ready a few more times, ‘being ready’ will never occur to you since it is automatic.

2. Ready position requires you to bend down on both feet and a slight tip-toe. Whilst defending, I find it good to usually stand between 1/2 to 2/3’s on the back of the court.

Attacking clears from opponents are usually stupid and is only good when the opponents are way off position. If you stand like where I do anyway, you can usually retreat in time anyway. If caught, then you simply arch back, do a drop shot, then you’ve gained the initiative on your next shot.

Which leaves drop shots. If they are good, I use the stored energy from bending the right foot to spring my left foot forward (a big step). Then I take another big step with my right foot and lift cross court.

I weigh like 110 lb so I cannot advise you on the split step since I find it completely unnecessary. And yeah, you gotta wait till the shuttle moved before you do. Exception is if you know your opponent cannot do a smash from the position and the cross court guy should move forward so you can gain the initiative.

September 7, 2014
8:54 am
Avatar
Paul Stewart
Cheshire, UK
Admin
Forum Posts: 1283
Member Since:
February 15, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Many thanks Alex for your comments.

When you are over 40 reaction times diminish. You can train them to a degree. This is part mental training and the remainder is down to physical conditioning. A healthy diet and good conditioning make a huge difference.

Apart from that, training via repetition really helps.

Paul

September 8, 2014
9:10 am
Avatar
Roger
West Midlands UK
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 147
Member Since:
March 10, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

All keen followers of Paul’s forum know that good footwork is key to playing the game well.

If you want to know what footwork speed and agility a top player has, do this.

Pick any top doubles match off youtube and cover the top part of the court with a newspaper. This means that you can concentrate on the footwork of the closest pair. You will immediately see the answer to Dobbies question, the players NEVER stop moving, except for serving and receiving. By doing this their leg muscles are primed and loaded at all times and ready to react immediately.

This dazzling footwork only comes from years of training at the highest level.
So what can us mere mortals do. Easy. Splitsteps
.
By doing these little movements just before the opponent hits the shuttle your brain is sending a message to you legs. Get ready to move.

I know the challenge is to remember, especially in a match, but it’s well worth persevering.Keep thinking SPLIT just before the opponent hits.

Hope this helps
Roger

September 9, 2014
8:11 am
Avatar
Dobbie98
Member
Members

VIP Coaching Program Members
Forum Posts: 165
Member Since:
December 4, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Thank you for your replies : ) Roger will give it a go re newspaper. as you say I also get distracted by watching the shuttle. Also think maybe LCW was the wrong person to follow.

Forum Timezone: Europe/London

Most Users Ever Online: 196

Currently Online:
5 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

Matthew Seeley: 391

Peter Warman: 239

Ed: 186

Dobbie98: 165

gingerphil79: 158

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 10

Members: 1510

Moderators: 1

Admins: 2

Forum Stats:

Groups: 2

Forums: 8

Topics: 580

Posts: 4712

Newest Members:

nbaby, a_grimshaw@yahoo.com, poloplayer, Aron Roy, Michael Rathjen

Moderators: Design: 0

Administrators: AngieS: 0, Paul Stewart: 1283